Tazza is currently relocating
 
 
           
           
           
           
           
           
 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
TAZZA GALLERY- 547W 27ST-NEW YORK, NY 10001

Tazza Gallery is pleased to present
"Dreams of the Lesser Gods"
works by Scott Goodwillie.
Opens December 12th.

Of Goodwillies works The Frye Art Museum writes, “From Demons and Daddy . . . to Lilith and Shiva, American born artist Scott B. Goodwillie's emotionally-charged figures represent potent creative and destructive forces that provide a visceral 'punch' aimed at disrupting the viewers' normal categories of experience. The artist draws inspiration from a variety of ancient motifs as diverse as Greek and Himalayan myth and the theatrical surrealism of Fellini.

Painting in a realist style, Goodwillie combines smooth, studied Dutch brushstrokes with more edgy, contemporary subjects to create works that are both classically masterful and modern in mood. His Figuring the Forces exhibition features canvases populated by characters he has encountered in New York City, where he resides. In his art, however, he positions these models as archetypes and places them in imaginative and gripping situations. As a result, an intense energy permeates Goodwillie's scenes, which exploit the purgative powers of visual and psychological drama.

Goodwillie, who trained in the private atelier of Michael Aviano and at the Art Students League, is strongly influenced by art from the Renaissance and Baroque eras, as evidenced by his dynamic compositions, dramatic chiaroscuro, and rich striking palettes. His brushwork is as masterful as his finely tuned use of light. Additionally, he has perfected the strength of his figural passages and his nuances of movement are highly accomplished.

With a love for painting and a passion for expressing the emotional, Goodwillie's work fascinates the eye even while stirring, troubling, and sometimes amusing the heart. Viewers are compelled to take a closer look and coaxed into creating their own construction of meaning.”

For press inquires or for more information contact Denis Arguedas, Director of Tazza Gallery at denis@tazzagallery.com.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
TAZZA GALLERY- 547W 27ST-NEW YORK, NY 10001


Tazza Gallery is pleased to present "Nice To Meet You,"
works by Italian artist Marco Santaniello.
Opens November 14th.


Welcome to the world of Marco Santaniello. He describes himself as an international Pop artist and a fashion superstar. For "Nice to Meet You" the artist has created a series of graphic designs exploring themes including celebrity, politics, religion and his beloved New York City. The exhibition is divided in three bodies of works- portraits, NYC scenes and daily life (with satirical content).

Marco's portraits capture the celebrity of his subjects with ease. They are colorful and glamorous renditions of already iconic faces presented against a rainbow-like mosaic of his design. Each subject is presented as a recognizable image, as it has registered in the public consciousness, but without sacrificing the essence and the humanity behind the celebrity.

The NYC scenes are inspired by the artist's love for the city. He roams the streets looking for that particular corner or street that in the middle of an ordinary, fast-paced and energized day offers the artist a moment of realization amidst the routine chaos. His street scenes are colorful windows that capture the ordinary and the extraordinary in this iconic city.

The show's third body of work presents what the artist calls his "satirical content." In these works the artist explores and exposes his views on religion, art, politics, society, fashion and so much more. They are presented through the lens of irony and some times criticism; they point out the absurdity and superficiality of fanaticism, consumerism and other maladies of modern life.

For press inquires or for more information contact Denis Arguedas, Director of Tazza Gallery at denis@tazzagallery.com.

Exhibition // Daniele Davitti: Immaculate Decay

As supermodels and fashion designers elbow their way to the top and high glamour swamps New York, and as spotlights illuminate the most beautiful and famous people of the world, a small gallery in Chelsea is showing an exceptional Italian artist who depicts our contemporary society and especially the fashion world from the other side of the coin.

Skewed faces, distorted bodies, skinny women, and sad eyes. Empty landscapes and references to ancient worlds. Daniele Davitti’s paintings and drawings, mostly realized with watercolors and Japanese ink painting or calligraphy, depict today’s society through a body of work that has been developed under a number of different cultural influences. In his grotesque figures we can identify Renaissance paintings and frescos, Japanese prints and illustrations, and fashion design motifs, as well as strong references to Modern Art in the sensibility of Goya and De Chirico. Equally important are 18th and 19th Century influences, from classical music to Art Nouveau. Their cultural and artistic manifestations complete Davitti’s very personal and remarkable style.

Davitti’s images address narratives about the beauty of decay, the loss of identity, and the struggle for resurrection from a past that keeps holding its shadow over the present. His works are born out of his deep reluctance for the synthetic and false beauties that our society classifies as ideal. He calls them “beautiful containers without content” while puckering his face. The roots of his critique grow beyond the realm of shiny pictures of the haute couture world. As the youngest fashion design professor in Italy (he teaches at the Polimoda and IULM), he offers insight into what the fashion world means today to the future generation of creative fashion makers: “I must sadly admit that most of my students start school without having any dreams to pursue, without any critical thought and little passion. In a country where past and present riches are threatened by an economic crisis and neglected by a corrupt and too often ineffectual bureaucracy, people don’t believe in the future anymore and seem to live in an eternal apnea.” Enriched by sumptuous patterns, sophisticated symbols and crumbling architectures, the composition of Davitti’s paintings and drawings display the human species on a dramatic stage.

He gleans inspiration from artists of the first half of the 20th century – Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, and the Expressionists. The tragedy and comedy of those times play a substantial role, merged with his own experiences in Asian countries where he spent some time studying Japanese calligraphy, engraving, and textile design.

Caterina, a princess with a winged hat decorated with death-symbols, thus welcomes us at the entrance of the gallery, setting the tone for the entire exhibition. Her voluptuous body is wrapped with precious fabrics in contrast to her sharp facial features and vacant stare. It seems as if she has emerged from former times to keep order over the evolution of today’s beauties.

Elder women, with Geisha-like heads, denude in front of the spectator (Corhabeo). The headpieces remind one of archeological relics, while the dresses combine clear references to Japanese / Roman times and contemporary stylists such as McQueen, Galliano, and Balenciaga. The transmission of decay and suffering creates a strange excitement in the audience.

“Infelici Stanze” is a group of Vampire-like women whose faces beg for affection and attention, whose gestures convey an attachment to a glamorous but fake world. With their captivating and aggressive glances they bewitch the scene. We can recognize famous models from the ’50s like Suzy Parker and Lisa Fonssagrives, as well as present celebrities like Belen Rodriguez, Kim Kardashian and Snooki. Other works are portraits of lonely existences or imaginary romantic scenes in daily life. Love and seduction, suffering and mistrust, history and heritage are rarely absent in his paintings, drawings, and illustrations of different scales.

Daniele Davitti thus introduces a complex sensitivity to the social and political sphere within the fashion industry. The beauty of his works is coupled with a deep criticism of the superficiality and unease with which our contemporary society hides behind that facade of coveted glamour.

from Berlin Art Link
Article by Sarah Corona in New York; Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
TAZZA GALLERY- 547W 27ST-NEW YORK, NY 10001

August 24, 13
“Immaculate Decay”
Daniele Davitti, Italian
Curated by Veronica Santi (*)
Tazza Gallery is pleased to announce Daniele Davitti’s first solo exhibition, “Immaculate Decay,” September 5th through the 4th.

Writer and curator Veronica Santi on the exhibition:

"Ho impugnato un ferro da stiro per togliere le rughe
dal gigantesco corpo in cui vivo da tempo
una farfalla per i bei colori mi ha distratto per un poco…"
Luigi Ontani

["I held up a flatiron to remove the wrinkles 
Of the giant body where I live my time
A butterfly with fair colors distracted me a bit…"]


In his New York debut and first solo exhibition, Daniele Davitti takes the risk of wearing his most transparent and authentic outfit, showing with his work something of the decadence of contemporary Italian society and the difficulties the artist has encountered while trying to function within it. 

In a country like Italy where past and present riches are threatened by an economic crisis and neglected by a corrupt and, too often, ineffectual bureaucracy, people don’t believe in the future anymore and seem to live in an eternal apnea. While other Mediterranean countries are convulsed by revolutions, nothing changes in Italy and the newest generation seems unable, or, at least, unwilling to join or fight. During the past four years Daniele Davitti has built his identity as an artist in exactly these “sur-so-real” conditions. His eyes explored human emotions and interactions in everyday life, crystallizing them into images that are, at the same time, striking and splendid. 
Enriched by sumptuous patterns, sophisticate symbols and crumbling architectures, the composition of Davitti’s paintings follows "grotesque" stories where the human species seems to be biologically degenerating into these beautiful creatures, an amalgam of women, mummies and skeletons. 

Davitti’s imagery has been developed with a number of cultural influences.
Stylized hand gestures, great families posed like Renaissance paintings and frescos rendered with grey, white and beige colors attest to his Florentine roots.

From the time he spent in Osaka, his works also carry influences of Japanese prints and illustrations as well as Zen philosophy and wabi-sabi aesthetics. Black ink and a bold, confident line construct his figures.

Equally important are the 18th and 19th centuries – from classical music to Art Nouveau – their cultural and artistic manifestations complete Davitti’s very personal and singular style. 


The result is a eulogy to the beauty of the decay and it speaks to us as if from an immaculate past, where the artist resides as the lone survivor, trying to communicate to us his solitude amid the ruins. 

For more information and press inquires, contact Denis Arguedas, director of Tazza Gallery at 201 414 4811.


(*) New York based, Italian writer and critic Veronica Santi is an Art Historian with an international career in the arts. She graduated form University of Florence with a Major in International Studies and from the University of Bologna with a Major in Contemporary Art. She has curated shows in New York and has collaborated in several publications.


 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

TAZZA GALLERY
547W 27ST NEW YORK, NY 10001

Out of Order
Japanese artist Tadasuke Jinno's second solo exhibition in New York City, Curated by Denis Arguedas

Of this series the artist comments, "My recent works consist of two or more canvases - hand-shaped, designed and mounted on stretchers - created to conform to the specific patterns of each work. A sense of incongruity is expressed through the juxtaposition of the filled and empty spaces and the contrasting matted and polished surfaces of the canvas. The harmony created in this incongruity establishes a dialog among all the different values of color, shape, line, movement, perspective and shadow."

The opening reception for "Out of Order" is on August 1st from 6 to 8 at Tazza Gallery.

For press inquires or more information contact Denis Arguedas, Director of Tazza Gallery, at 201 414 4811.

 

June 22, 13

Press Release
"Alien"
A debut exhibition in New York City for American artist Zac Rōz Curated by Denis Arguedas

Tazza Gallery is pleased to announce “Alien,” paintings by contemporary visual artist Zac Rōz. “Alien” consists of figure paintings that channel stylistic elements of abstraction, organic free-flowing brushstrokes, realism, crisp geometric lines and planes. These elements are used in confounding yet alluring combinations that offer a unique twist on figure painting.

Influenced by the highly idealized male figure ubiquitous in Greek and Roman art, these works highlight the classical concept of the beauty of the human form, but they also take the viewer beyond it. In these works the artist conveys a particular sense of masculine beauty that retains a sense of strength yet embodies delicacy: these strange beautiful creatures are no doubt human, but they also carry a peculiar mystique that conjures a sense of otherworldliness.

Set amid striking backdrops of highly saturated colors, the figures are at once beautiful and seductive. Like colorful flowers, they have a certain magnetism, yet, at the same time, they appear distant. The solitary figures - sometimes just ghostly fragments - are eerily vapid; each figure possesses a quality of anonymity that is underscored by the collectively similar and beautiful shells that they inhabit.

The same beauty that hides is a mask that also draws attention to that which it is concealing. Plastic exteriors, built with bright colors and the notion of vanity, mask but also accentuate a dark irony found in the juxtaposition of subjective appreciation of likeness and the true essence of each figure. This juxtaposition encourages the viewer to consider themes of isolation, alienation, and the relationship of these themes to the concept of beauty.

The show runs from June 27 to July 19

For more information and press inquires, contact Denis Arguedas, director of Tazza Gallery at (201) 414 4811.

Tazza Gallery, 547 W 27th St, Suite 533.
www.tazzagallery.com
(212) 967-1400

 

April 8, 2013

Press Release
"Essence"
Alessandro Del Pero, Italian Curated by Denis Arguedas

Tazza Gallery is pleased to announce the exhibition "Essence," new paintings by artist Alessandro Del Pero. It opens with a reception on May 16th and runs through June 9th.

The show draws from two series of works that the artist has created while living and painting in Harlem. The first series features what appears to be his atelier. Del Pero's background in architecture allows him to create and command the space on his canvas with ease. Here the light appears to be adventitious, as if coming directly from the viewer's realm and it somehow propels us, uninvited, into his private space and into the scene. What do we find there? Props and objects scattered in a seemingly random manner. Observe with care and you'll discover that there is nothing random about the objects or about anything in these compelling compositions. These pictures are personal windows into the artist's psyche and each can be seen and read as a self-portrait; they can be enigmatic but they are always intriguing.

For his Heads series, a subject Del Pero has been exploring since he started painting, there is a freedom of line and form that almost transfigures them into abstraction. The heads seem to be in a state of auto transformation. They appear fleshy, tangible but at the same time possessed by that intrinsic quality that can only be called, Essence.

Commenting on the show, Tazza Gallery Director Denis Arguedas said, "I love Alessandro's ability to render without pretentions. He exorcises his canvas of any preconceptions of aesthetics, conventional standards of beauty, traditional subjects and rules. Things are presented as they are and even when they conform to their nature there is in them, always, a second identity. He gives everything to the observer but we cannot help to see that there is something else. It takes us a moment to comprehend that the missing element is, perhaps, ourselves, the viewer. His paintings are never static. We approach them and they grab us, pulling us in, always amusing us like sirens under the allure of the drama created by shadows, the contour of a hanging rope or the frustration and struggle of a crashed piece of paper.

This is Alessandro Del Pero's second New York solo show. He was also featured this spring in a solo show in Dusseldorf at Galerie T.

Tazza Gallery, 547 W 27th St, Suite 533.
www.tazzagallery.com
(212) 967-1400

Press Release
Tazza Gallery is pleased to announce "Sui Generis," an exhibition of new works by American artist John Selburg. The exhibition opens with a reception on the evening of April 18th and runs through May 10th.

"Sui Generis" features creatures that are the product of the artist's imagination. Each picture is a unique work of art. These creatures, the Emissaries, serve as a bridge between the concrete and the fantastic. They aim to reawaken our capacity to use our imagination just as we did when we were children.

Commenting on the show Tazza Gallery Director, Denis Arguedas said:

"The works for this new show build on what John did for his first solo show, 'The Emissaries of the Afterglow,' which was an important success for John and for the Gallery. In 'Sui Generis' the works are larger in scale and bolder. This scale allows more complexity in form and an even richer color palette- all without sacrificing the high level of detail and craftsmanship we're used to seeing in Johns 'work."

Tazza Gallery, 547 W 27th St, Suite 533.
www.tazzagallery.com
(212) 967-1400

March 18th, 2013
From March 21st to April 12th, Tazza Gallery in Chelsea presents Unguarded Moments, documentary photography by Carlos Couto.

Inspired by his travels as a U.S. Army soldier, the artist captures unguarded, fleeting moments across the urban landscape of Mumbai. Describing the exhibition, Carlos says “Unguarded Moments documents a time and its people with their hopes and despair, their work and leisure, their world as they see it. It speaks of the present but also of the past.
It looks for the poetry in the most unlikely moments and places.”

Tazza Gallery, 547 W 27th St, Suite 533. Tuesday through Saturday, 12–6.

Late night reception every Thursday, 6‐8 pm. For more information visit us at http://www.tazzagallery.com/ or on Facebook.

February 06, 2013
“Emissaries of the Afterglow” The Art of John Selburg

Running until February 16th, 2013, Tazza Gallery, located in the heart of the gallery district in Chelsea, will present “Emissaries of the Afterglow” paintings by the young American artist, John Selburg.

Considered to be one of the most imaginative artists of our time John Selburg is a painter, writer and teacher from Peoria, IL. The pictures for this exhibition consist of a series of creatures (the “Emissaries of the Afterglow”) skillfully painted on paper using ink and watercolor. Each of these pieces is a unique and compelling work of art. These beings, according to the artist, serve as dignified messengers, “they are intended to usher us into a realm where imagination plays a vital roll in emancipating us from a herd mentality.”

Tazza Gallery, 547 W 27th St, Suite 533. Tuesday through Saturday, 12 – 6.

Late night reception every Thursday, 6-8 pm. For more information visit us at www.tazzagallery.com or on Facebook.

December 17, 2012
“Emissaries of the Afterglow” The Art of John Selburg

Running from December 20th to February 16th, 2013, Tazza Gallery, located in the heart of the gallery district in Chelsea, will present “Emissaries of the Afterglow” paintings by the young American artist, John Selburg.

Considered to be one of the most imaginative artists of our time John Selburg is a painter, writer and teacher from Peoria, IL. The pictures for this exhibition consist of a series of creatures (the “Emissaries of the Afterglow”) skillfully painted on paper using ink and watercolor. Each of these pieces is a unique and compelling work of art. These beings, according to the artist, serve as dignified messengers, “they are intended to usher us into a realm where imagination plays a vital roll in emancipating us from a herd mentality.”

Tazza Gallery, 547 W 27th St, Suite 533. Tuesday through Saturday, 12 – 6.
Late night reception every Thursday, 6-8 pm. For more information visit us at www.tazzagallery.com or on Facebook.

Alessandro Del Pero
“Effort” at Tazza Gallery
By Veronica Santi (*)

He looks at us and he looks into himself. He dives, struggles, flies, contorts his body; he is searching for something. Only in the end does he acknowledge his ego; putting himself in the game without declaring it, simply painting his own gaze. Because the gaze is the surface, where appearances dissolve and an inner truth can be revealed. Such a gaze tells us stories without encroaching in our intimacy.

A painting by Italian artist Alessandro Del Pero does not pretend to be self-referential. It holds its place with dignity, immolating itself to public judgment without shame; moreover, it can be understood as a true and honest declaration of the self.

Let’s examine one large-scale work he has titled “Patience”. Here Del Pero paints himself in his studio; not once, but three times.

First, the self-portrait placed on the right side of the composition stares at us, catching our eye. We’re drawn into the painter’s studio and, it seems, invited to explore its secrets. The exploration, however, is short-lived because we are captured by a second presence, the shadow on the left which surprises us and finally, the naked and curled up body of the third ego. This man, laying in the fetal position with his back to us, represents the hearth of the painting. He forces us to empathize with him; he moves us and then directs us back to the self-portrait which now seems to be a mirror looking right back at us.

Regardless of their symbolic meaning, the chain of relations among the three egos is theatricality painted, involving and stimulating the spectator with techniques that reach back to the Renaissance and that here are used or, maybe, unwittingly assimilated by the Italian artist. One could consider Piero Della Francesca’s “Madonna of Sinigallia” from 1470, where the angel on the left of the painting looks out to us and draws us into the scene, while the angel on the right directs us to the central characters, the Madonna and the Baby Jesus. In Della Francesca's painting the apex of relations ends with the baby Jesus’ iconic gesture that radiates the Word all over the world. In Del Pero’s “Patience” the circle of relations ends with the gaze set into the self-portrait, as care and cover, as a safe seaport; it is the soul of the painting where we can silently feel the rhythm of patience.

Those eyes, purposely drawn in a realistic manner, are present in many of Del Pero’s works. They represent his deep vocation for painting but also his worldview as seen through his eyes and his experiences.

Floating on the skin of the visible, in fact, the gaze is always affected by our previous visions, our stories and by how we perceive the world. In the same way, like eyes, paintings are a surface and a source of esthetic pleasure, but also, as the gaze, they show parts of an inner self that come from our own experience. The artist fixes on the canvas a single instant subjectively looked at and lived allowing it to survive at the death: so mediated, beauty and reality rise from the artwork continually restoring the world from a wondered stupor.

Therefore, if he bravely decides to quit a career as an architect to pursue what had been his avocation, he paints his paintings and then paints himself as a painter. If he is afraid of the sea, he paints swimmers, men that dive into the void or that, simply take a shower. Or, if he falls asleep in his Europe and then he awakens among Harlem strangers, self-portraits become universal portraits.

It is easy to get lost in the liquid surface of the eyes, and, in our imaginations, to cross that magnetic and translucent threshold that leads us into memories and push us to the heart of the human soul. And if in every person there is an unbounded world to explore through a gaze, Alessandro's works can be seen as giant eyes, a portal, that touch and transport us far away.

(*) New York based, Italian writer and critic Veronica Santi is an Art Historian with an international career in the arts. She graduated form University of Florence with a Major in International Studies and from the University of Bologna with a Major in Contemporary Art. She has curated shows in New York and has collaborated in several publications.

For more information visit www.tazzagallery.com.

October 18, 2012
This fall Tazza Gallery presents “Iconic,” works by American artist Gail Postal. The exhibition opens on October 18th at Tazza Gallery in Chelsea.

“Iconic” is a series of paintings in multimedia of what the artist calls “Contemporary Saints.” Inspired by ancient Orthodox paintings during a visit to Russia, Gail Postal paints contemporary people and sets them in bright, golden backgrounds. She paints on board using graphite and oil and incorporates glitter and Swarovski crystal in some of her figures. Gail believes that every individual is a gift and that everyone deserves the same level of respect and veneration that is given to traditional saints and religious icons.

The opening for “Iconic” is on October 18th from 6 to 8 PM. The exhibition continues through November 11th. Tazza Gallery is located at 547 W 27th St, New York, NY 10001.

For more information visit www.tazzagallery.com.